Implantology

Implantology

A dental implant is a small screw that is placed into the lower or upper jaw bone where a tooth is missing. Most often it is made of titanium, a biocompatible material which forms an intimate bond to the bone because the body does not recognize it as a foreign body. An implant serves as a substitute for the root of the tooth, i.e. as a support for a crown, bridge or denture.

The process of placing an implant is painless because it is done under local anesthesia. During the first visit to the dentist, an implant is placed into the bone and covered by the mucous membrane. The period of forming a bond between the bone and the implant (osseointegration) lasts between 3 and 6 months. After that period of time, the implant is opened and a prolongation for the healing of gums, which remains there for 2-4 weeks, is inserted. Then, additional materials are placed on the implant, an impression is taken and prosthodontic procedure is completed. The addition of a dental material to a tooth plays the role of a filed down tooth, and a ceramic crown (tooth crown) is placed on top of it at the end.